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630 High Street, Thornbury
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About Hive

A FUTURE CLASSIC OF THE NORTH

A future classic of Melbourne's skyline, Hive represents a new wave of architecture for living in the inner-north, immediately recognisable with a striking tessellated exterior complimented by soaring lines of shadow and light.

A commitment to creativity, to a new way of living: the Hive is yours to join. Beautiful to the eye and sensuous to the touch, each Hive residence enjoys twinkling urban vistas, generous living zones, private balconies, opulent kitchens, resort-inspired bathrooms and secure parking.

Imagined by Rothelowman and realised by Chamberlain Architects in response to Thornbury's natural capacity for reinvention, each of the 66 carefully-finished one, two and three bedroom Hive apartments offer a sense of calm luxury across their flowing, bright floorplans.

Hive's finely appointed designer residences are a dedication to Thornbury: Melbourne's new creative heart. Pairing a singular vision for living with luxe-minimalist interiors, Hive buzzes with the energy of a premium location - so close to the cafes and creative pop-up culture of the north, to its old school produce markets, quirky high street shopping and the comforting ring of the number 86 tram.

630 High Street, Thornbury

About the area

Thornbury's Buzzing

There's something so intrinsically Melbourne about Thornbury. A nostalgic neighbourhood at the heart of our city's creative reimagining, Thornbury has always attracted those seeking to lay down their roots and contribute to something bigger. Nestled just north of the CBD, Thornbury offers a vibrant combination of heritage homes and modern architecture, cafés and fine dining, pop-up everything, lush parklands and quirky high street shopping.

First surveyed by Robert Hoddle in 1837, Thornbury has developed from a humble market garden township by the Merri Creek into the most coveted locale of the inner-north. Well-serviced by trams, trains, schools and hospitals, Thornbury is the best of Australia in a microcosm: a community diverse in age and ethnicity, living and working together in a way that honors our history.

Meet the locals

Live the sweet life in Thornbury

Louise Popowitz

Local Thornbury resident

Marco Finanzio

Owner of Joanie's Baretto & Umberto's espresso

Tony Deluca

MD of DPG

Jay Chubb

Nest Coworking Thornbury
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PRIVACY POLICY

This Privacy Policy applies to FRIENDLEE PTY. LTD. A.B.N. 31 885 208 972 of 211 Wellington Street, Collingwood VIC, its related entities (within the meaning of the Corporations Act 2001) and associates ("Developer").

In the process of operating its business, the Developer handles, collects, processes, records, stores and discloses personal information relating to purchasers, potential purchases, tenants and potential tenants of properties within the development, as well as employees, contractors, sub-contractors and consultants. The Developer takes seriously its obligations under the Privacy Act 1988 (Cth) (as amended) ("Privacy Act") and the National Privacy Principals. This Privacy Policy explains how the Developer complies with those obligations.

COLLECTION AND TYPE OF INFORMATION COLLECTED

The type of personal information collected by the Developer about a person depends on the type of dealings that the person has with the Developer. In most circumstances, the Developer collects personal information directly from the person to whom the information relates.

The Developer does not normally collect sensitive information as defined under the Privacy Act, such as information relating to health, religious or political beliefs, unless a person provides it to the Developer for a specific purpose.

USE AND DISCLOSURE OF PERSONAL INFORMATION

Generally, the Developer uses or discloses the personal information it collects only for the purpose which was specifically or reasonably apparent at the time that the information was collected and for any purpose ancillary or consequential to the primary purpose of collection such as obtaining finance or professional advice and accurate file management. To this end the Developer may use the services of agents, service providers or contractors.

The Developer may use the personal information it holds for the purposes of research and future product development. The Developer may send marketing material to its customers, either by post or electronically, unless a person has advised the Developer in writing that they do not wish to receive such information.

The Developer may also provide the personal information to any third party:

• if required by law;
• who is a purchaser, potential purchaser, tenant or prospective tenant of all or part of the Development;
• who is a purchaser or potential purchaser of the Developer's business; and
• who is an agent or consultant of the Developer, for the purposes of marketing the Development to potential purchasers and potential tenants.

The Developer will not sell personal information to other companies. If the Developer wishes to use or disclose the personal information in other circumstances, it will first obtain the consent of the person to whom it relates

STORAGE OF INFORMATION

The Developer endeavours to secure all personal information it holds, and to keep that information accurate and up-to-date. The Developer requires that all employees and consultants to whom it discloses personal information respect the confidentially of that personal information at all times.

The Developer will retain the personal information as long as necessary, subject to the Developer's legal obligations to store certain information or unless otherwise stated in this policy. The Developer will take all reasonable steps to comply with a person's request to delete or destroy their personal information held by the Developer, unless the Developer is compelled by law to retain it, it is require to resolve certain disputes or for auditing purposes.

A person may request at any time that a copy of any personal information held by the Developer is provided and may advise the Developer of any corrections necessary. A reasonable administration fee may apply for the cost of accessingthis information.

WEBSITE

No data or transmission over the internet can be guaranteed to be secure. The Developer cannot guarantee the protection of information that a person transmits when accessing this website.

The Developer may measure and record information about the number of visitors and their use of the site for trends and statistics for marketing purposes or for the purpose of making the website more relevant and user-friendly.

This website may provide links to other websites and may be linked from other websites. The Developer is not responsible for the privacy practices of the operators of those websites and is not liable for their conduct. The terms and conditions of those websites should be checked carefully before any personal information is disclosed on any linked website.

Cookie Policy

The Hive Thornbury website uses cookies, tracking pixels and related technologies. Cookies are small data files that are served by our platform and stored on your device. Our site uses cookies dropped by us or third parties for a variety of purposes including to operate and personalize the website. Also, cookies may also be used to track how you use the site to target ads to you on other websites. To remove yourself from these lists, please email breon@blinkcreative.com.au.

ACCURACY OF PERSONAL INFORMATION

The Developer takes all reasonable steps to ensure that the information it collects is accurate, complete and up to date at the time of collection. A person should contact the Developer if their circumstances change or they have reason to believe the Developer's records are not accurate, complete or up to date. The Developer will take all reasonable steps to amend the information in accordance with the above criteria.

FURTHER INFORMATION

For further information regarding privacy issues, visit the Australian Federal Privacy Commissioner's website at http://www.privacy.org.au .

Louise Popowitz

Local Thornbury resident

"I think Thornbury is a really nice, loving area. I've moved here from Denmark to Melbourne, and I'm studying Urban Planning and Environment at RMIT. I'm interested in how cities can attract more people – and what makes people use a city.

I know that Thornbury has become really vibrant of late – I'd credit that to the amount of bustling cafes along High Street which create a lot of life on the street itself.

The council has made the suburb more accessible too – there are marked bikepaths on the road and the sidewalks are nice and wide, so people linger more.

On an average weekend in Thornbury, I'd go out for brunch or a morning coffee and maybe have a browse up and down High Street before going home to make lunch with goodies from Psarakos market.

I like going to there – my flatmates had a wine and cheese last week and we went to Psarakos for our supplies – they offer a personal service and they're really friendly and chatty. There's a lot of that kind of atmosphere here in Thornbury. I've been to Farouk's Olive too, and it was fantastic! We went on a Friday night and they had a horn band playing – people were dancing and laughing. I think it was a Balkan music night. We couldn't help dancing too, everyone was smiling – that's a great place to go to. It's really the small businesses that make neighbourhoods alive. You get to know the owners and their whole vibe when you come into their shop. It's a shame to see huge malls and big carparks becoming more popular - it's not personal and it doesn't bring any atmosphere to a town either.

Thornbury feels really Australian to me – the wide roads and low streetscapes are one thing that make it so.

In Europe, there's more apartments on the main street. Here, you're still built quite low on the main street. In Denmark, families live quite happily in apartments – they go to parks to run around and socialise more outside of home.

I've spoken to Australian friends about the Great Australian Dream – they want the backyard, they want the garage – those factors are not so important in Europe. The American Dream seems to be about making a living, whereas the Great Australian Dream still seems to be about buying a home on a quarter acre block. That will probably change as more people move to apartments.

I plan on staying in Thornbury. I miss Copenhagen and my friends, but I also really like being in Melbourne. I haven't felt this happy ever, I think."

Marco Finanzio

Owner of Joanie's Baretto & Umberto's espresso

"My Dad (Umberto) settled in Thornbury on Harold St in 1956 along with a whole lot of other southern Italian migrants after the war. My Mum is Aussie, she's from Carlton – my Dad is from Calabria. He migrated as a child. Dad went to primary school here, but he only lasted only six months - he was teased so much he just went to work. His is a familiar story - lots of migrants from all over the world do it tough and sacrifice for a better life when they move to a new country. My Dad's family settled in Thornbury, they chose to live in a migrant community that made them feel supported. Dad has done everything: welding, pastry making, he even opened a sandwich bar on King Street in the city. He lived on Harold Street for 35 years and when he was married he moved to Lalor, which is where I grew up.

Dad began with Mocopan Coffee in the 1980's which was when espresso started to become popular in Australia

- everyone was drinking International Roast back then and real coffee was revolutionary. On my school holidays I used to work at Mocopan too - I'd go with the delivery man and make drops into the little coffee shops on Acland Street – it was my first pocket money. I chose to open Umberto's in Thornbury because I am a hugely nostalgic type of person - at Joanie's Barretto (Marco's second business on High Street, quite close to Umberto's) I've got an installation featuring the migrant story of my parents and their friends. Although itwas hard work, they also had fun in those early days!

Because of my family's rich history here, I was drawn back to Thornbury.

Back in the day, Thornbury was heaving. High Street was a mecca: the best grocers, florists and fresh produce. When I was growing up, the central meeting point in Thornbury was an old espresso joint. Every week Dad would take my brother and I, and we'd just hang out with him there. He'd catch up with his mates and talk about the old days, while we'd spend time on the pinball machine. People were smoking and gambling - it wasn't the healthiest environment – but they were good people! They all had their nicknames, classic Italian ones. Dad's mates were Mario the Tailor, Vic the builder – Jimmy Mancini. These guys are absolute characters – you could write a film about any of these men, they're bigger than life.

Thornbury has changed a lot in the past five years.

When Umberto's first opened, there was barely any foot-traffic, and now there's people walking past all the time.

Increasingly, people don't really entertain at home anymore - and it seems that high density living means eating out. We've always got a buzz of customers around us – you can set their clock to their appearance for coffee in the morning or dinner at night. Umberto's is even being mentioned at auctions now – that's pretty cool. ‘Only a 3 minute walk to Umberto's!', the auctioneer will call.

People feel ownership of this place because they've seen us grow, develop and get busy. We try and keep it as a simple place to meet, chat and hang out. It's really simple food – there's nothing difficult about what we make, and there's real comfort in that. I want everyone to feel comfortable here - we've got traditional Italian stuff at Umberto's, but also turntables and vinyl. It's approachable Italian without being cheesy.

If you swing by, come try our signature ragu – it's going to be featured in a new Broadsheet cookbook coming out later in the year. People were up in arms when the ragu came off the menu for the first time in summer – they want to eat it even in 40 degree heat! Our veal scallopini is a favorite too. And our coffee - we use a super brazil Genovese which mirrors our philosophy as a family business – simple, done well, done right. Our espressos are $2.50 and they're as good as anyone's. I'm not changing that: coffee in Europe is a staple and shouldn't be unaffordable. It's a social thing, you might have a couple a day – so they can't be too expensive.

Thornbury is so vibrant – there's always something new to discover. I love Kitchen Iroha which is a Japanese restaurant on High Street - they offer very authentic food and they're good guys. The Manufactory is also worth visiting – they stock wonderful homewares and quirky gifts."

Tony Deluca

OMD of DPG

"Thornbury has always been a part of my life. I've been in this area for 60 years.

I lived in Northcote on Archibold Street, and my family lived there for over 50 years. I started my accounting business in Thornbury – Deluca Partners (which is opposite Hive) in 1970 when I was 21. As the years went by, my business grew and partners joined. I sold that business in 2008 – I'm proud to say it is still called Deluca Partners and that my photo is still hung on the wall inside!

The site we'll be developing Hive upon came onto the market through a friend of ours. I am the Managing Director of Deluca Property Group – I take care of the financial side of the business – being an accountant. Where Hive will soon be built was once an old auction house, and previous to that it was a car dealership, ‘Mini World'.

Thornbury Village has changed quite a lot over the years - ‘BizzBuzz' hardware store once took pride of place with its iconic ‘hammer' signage. The family butcher next door to Deluca Partners still remains, as does the hairdresser.

It's really buzzing now – for a while High Street north was quite uninhabited – but now it's all happening.

People really love Thornbury - it's close to the city. Transport is very good, you've got trains and trams and everything you need, buses to the shopping centres, the universities. A lot of younger people are moving into the city – they don't want to live in suburbia anymore. The demographics of Thornbury are really are changing – young professionals live here, whereas previously it was a migrant population. These original migrants have moved further north, but now they're starting to move back in as they get older and look for convenience and lifestyle in retirement. Tenants are a big part of the mix, too.

At heart, the Great Australian Dream still exists. Everyone wants to buy their own property. The dream of buying a home with land has changed

– now people are interested in apartment living because it's more affordable.

People want to be in the inner city, they're happy to sacrifice on space for opportunity and accessibility. Hive apartments will be ideal for those who are looking for slightly larger apartments that offer room to truly live – perfect for downsizers who want to buy a beautiful new residence and still have money left over for retirement. We think young professionals and superannuation investors will also be attracted to Hive. My family will be retaining a few units ourselves as investors in Hive. Maybe my grandchildren will end up living there! I'm expecting another grandchild soon – I've already got four. DPG is a family business with its heart in Thornbury – we're so proud to be building here and providing beautiful housing for our community."

Jay Chubb

Nest Coworking

"Things are going so well here at Nest - there's a real community built around our 50-member strong coworking space.

Most of our members are from Thornbury - there are 5 social enterprises based here which are either non-profit organisations with a business arm, or businesses with a social purpose.

The people in the space have really started collaborating together: there's events happening, and it's just wonderful.

I think Thornbury has a really interesting mix of education and income. They are educated lefties, and so there's a lot of early adopter type people in this community who are interested in different social models.

I live next door to Nest Coworking in Thornbury; I've got a 20 second commute to work. Traffic's bad – sometimes there's someone else in the alleyway to walk around! I chose to set up Nest and to live in Thornbury because I ran a community centre here for a decade – during that time I set up a volunteer program teaching life skills and language to refugees. I interviewed hundreds of those people and I was inspired by those volunteers – they were so interested in getting out of a corporate lifestyle and making a difference in the world.

Similarly to Brunswick, in Thornbury there's a critical mass of people who give a shit about things.

There are two factors that stop people from getting out on their own: one is resources. People need to resource themselves and their families and it can be difficult to make the jump. The other thing is isolation. There's not a common framework in our culture assisting people to collaborate. If people are going to resource themselves in this new knowledge economy, they need support.

There's a real lack of institutional support around entrepreneurship which is where community coworking really comes in, to help people with the intensity of being totally responsible for resourcing their lives. Brother Alec is my favorite café – the food is amazing and their concept of service is a deep concept of service in the Buddhist sense. Other notables are Marco at Umberto's – he's the founder of the Salami Festival – and friend of mine, Jay, who runs Trumpy across from Naturally on High.

We also love the old man café up the road which represents the old school Greek community - we have a Greek woman who pulls up out the front of Nest at 11:00 am to pick up her husband from the café. The hilarious thing is that she pulls up and starts beeping her horn before she even stops. He walks really slowly to the car, it's very cute.

In Thornbury the creativity in the community is incredible.

Darebin as an area has the highest proportion of APRA registered people nationally – so there's a huge number of musicians, performers and creatives that live here.

Jay Chubb

Nest Coworking

"I think Thornbury is a really nice, loving area. I've moved here from Denmark to Melbourne, and I'm studying Urban Planning and Environment at RMIT. I'm interested in how cities can attract more people – and what makes people use a city.
I know that Thornbury has become really vibrant of late – I'd credit that to the amount of bustling cafes along High Street which create a lot of life on the street itself.
The council has made the suburb more accessible too – there are marked bikepaths on the road and the sidewalks are nice and wide, so people linger more.
On an average weekend in Thornbury, I'd go out for brunch or a morning coffee and maybe have a browse up and down High Street before going home to make lunch with goodies from Psarakos market.
I like going to there – my flatmates had a wine and cheese last week and we went to Psarakos for our supplies – they offer a personal service and they're really friendly and chatty. There's a lot of that kind of atmosphere here in Thornbury. I've been to Farouk's Olive too, and it was fantastic! We went on a Friday night and they had a horn band playing – people were dancing and laughing. I think it was a Balkan music night. We couldn't help dancing too, everyone was smiling – that's a great place to go to. It's really the small businesses that make neighbourhoods alive. You get to know the owners and their whole vibe when you come into their shop. It's a shame to see huge malls and big carparks becoming more popular - it's not personal and it doesn't bring any atmosphere to a town either.
Thornbury feels really Australian to me – the wide roads and low streetscapes are one thing that make it so.
In Europe, there's more apartments on the main street. Here, you're still built quite low on the main street. In Denmark, families live quite happily in apartments – they go to parks to run around and socialise more outside of home.
I've spoken to Australian friends about the Great Australian Dream – they want the backyard, they want the garage – those factors are not so important in Europe. The American Dream seems to be about making a living, whereas the Great Australian Dream still seems to be about buying a home on a quarter acre block. That will probably change as more people move to apartments.
I plan on staying in Thornbury. I miss Copenhagen and my friends, but I also really like being in Melbourne. I haven't felt this happy ever, I think."

Jay Chubb

Nest Coworking

"I think Thornbury is a really nice, loving area. I've moved here from Denmark to Melbourne, and I'm studying Urban Planning and Environment at RMIT. I'm interested in how cities can attract more people – and what makes people use a city.
I know that Thornbury has become really vibrant of late – I'd credit that to the amount of bustling cafes along High Street which create a lot of life on the street itself.
The council has made the suburb more accessible too – there are marked bikepaths on the road and the sidewalks are nice and wide, so people linger more.
On an average weekend in Thornbury, I'd go out for brunch or a morning coffee and maybe have a browse up and down High Street before going home to make lunch with goodies from Psarakos market.
I like going to there – my flatmates had a wine and cheese last week and we went to Psarakos for our supplies – they offer a personal service and they're really friendly and chatty. There's a lot of that kind of atmosphere here in Thornbury. I've been to Farouk's Olive too, and it was fantastic! We went on a Friday night and they had a horn band playing – people were dancing and laughing. I think it was a Balkan music night. We couldn't help dancing too, everyone was smiling – that's a great place to go to. It's really the small businesses that make neighbourhoods alive. You get to know the owners and their whole vibe when you come into their shop. It's a shame to see huge malls and big carparks becoming more popular - it's not personal and it doesn't bring any atmosphere to a town either.
Thornbury feels really Australian to me – the wide roads and low streetscapes are one thing that make it so.
In Europe, there's more apartments on the main street. Here, you're still built quite low on the main street. In Denmark, families live quite happily in apartments – they go to parks to run around and socialise more outside of home.
I've spoken to Australian friends about the Great Australian Dream – they want the backyard, they want the garage – those factors are not so important in Europe. The American Dream seems to be about making a living, whereas the Great Australian Dream still seems to be about buying a home on a quarter acre block. That will probably change as more people move to apartments.
I plan on staying in Thornbury. I miss Copenhagen and my friends, but I also really like being in Melbourne. I haven't felt this happy ever, I think."

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